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Jar Test

Reencle: Jar Test

Soil texture stands out as a crucial soil property that significantly influences essential soil functions such as water retention, drainage, and nutrient storage. A practical method for assessing soil texture is the Jar Test, a straightforward experiment providing insights into the relative proportions of sand, silt, and clay in the soil.

This experiment functions by segregating soil particles based on their sizes, with the largest particles (sand) settling at the bottom of the jar initially.

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Jan 18, 2024

Jar Test

A simple experiment to determine your soil’s textural class

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Soil texture stands out as a crucial soil property that significantly influences essential soil functions such as water retention, drainage, and nutrient storage. A practical method for assessing soil texture is the Jar Test, a straightforward experiment providing insights into the relative proportions of sand, silt, and clay in the soil.

This experiment functions by segregating soil particles based on their sizes, with the largest particles (sand) settling at the bottom of the jar initially.

1. Importance of Soil

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Where does the soil you use to grow plants come from? Soil is formed through the weathering of rocks by factors such as rain, wind, temperature, and living organisms. Over time, the soil layer deepens. It takes at least 1,000 years for 1 cm of soil to be created from rocks. During this period, carbon dioxide, oxygen, water, and various components in the rocks react, melting and accumulating in the topsoil. As leaves fall and roots die, organic matter is added. As time passes, microorganisms and organisms living in the soil decompose the organic matter, transforming it into fertile soil.

Soil is not only important for humans but also serves as a crucial habitat for many other living beings. Most plants, in fact almost all of them, root and grow in the soil. Without soil, plants simply cannot thrive. Soil becomes a home for plants, providing both a place to live and a source of nourishment. It acts as a living space for creatures that consume plants or live off those that do. Insects, for instance, feed on plants that grow in the soil, and birds, in turn, build nests in trees or grassy areas, consuming these insects. Additionally, various animals such as worms, moles, and ants reside within the soil. We, too, cultivate a diverse range of crops in soil-based fields and paddies for consumption. We rear livestock that graze on grass, providing us with meat. This underscores the fact that soil is fundamental to the entire ecosystem.

However, despite being such a vital resource, humanity often exploits and contaminates this resource recklessly. If the soil is polluted, plants cannot survive, making it difficult for animals to survive as well. If this continues, desertification progresses, making it challenging for most flora and fauna, including humans, to thrive. Fortunately, after experiencing the COVID-19 pandemic, many people have become interested in gardening, leading to increased awareness of the value of soil. Efforts are being made to handle soil with care. One of the best ways is consistently providing compost to the soil, and many people are making compost through various methods to enhance soil quality.

1. Importance of Soil

저용량.jpg__PID:e68f0528-028c-43a4-b024-833f9d5317c4

Where does the soil you use to grow plants come from? Soil is formed through the weathering of rocks by factors such as rain, wind, temperature, and living organisms. Over time, the soil layer deepens. It takes at least 1,000 years for 1 cm of soil to be created from rocks. During this period, carbon dioxide, oxygen, water, and various components in the rocks react, melting and accumulating in the topsoil. As leaves fall and roots die, organic matter is added.

As time passes, microorganisms and organisms living in the soil decompose the organic matter, transforming it into fertile soil. Soil is not only important for humans but also serves as a crucial habitat for many other living beings. Most plants, in fact almost all of them, root and grow in the soil. Without soil, plants simply cannot thrive. Soil becomes a home for plants, providing both a place to live and a source of nourishment. It acts as a living space for creatures that consume plants or live off those that do. Insects, for instance, feed on plants that grow in the soil, and birds, in turn, build nests in trees or grassy areas, consuming these insects. Additionally, various animals such as worms, moles, and ants reside within the soil. We, too, cultivate a diverse range of crops in soil-based fields and paddies for consumption. We rear livestock that graze on grass, providing us with meat. This underscores the fact that soil is fundamental to the entire ecosystem.

However, despite being such a vital resource, humanity often exploits and contaminates this resource recklessly. If the soil is polluted, plants cannot survive, making it difficult for animals to survive as well. If this continues, desertification progresses, making it challenging for most flora and fauna, including humans, to thrive. Fortunately, after experiencing the COVID-19 pandemic, many people have become interested in gardening, leading to increased awareness of the value of soil. Efforts are being made to handle soil with care. One of the best ways is consistently providing compost to the soil, and many people are making compost through various methods to enhance soil quality.

2. How do we measure the quality of Soil

To create quality soil, it's crucial to accurately assess the current condition of the soil you have. Fortunately, there's a simple method to determine the soil composition called the Mason Jar test. This test allows you to precisely evaluate the current state of your soil, helping you decide on the appropriate soil amendments. To explain the Jar test method in detail

1. On a dry day, grab a small shovel and scoop up some soil. Sort through it or sift it with an old colander to get rid of any larger debris, rocks, and organic materials like leaves, sticks, and roots

2. Take a glass jar and fill about half of it with the soil you want to test. Add a drop of dishwashing liquid and water to the jar, leaving about a 3cm gap at the top (leaving around 10% of space). Take a glass jar and fill about half of it with the soil you want to test. Add a drop of dishwashing liquid and water to the jar, leaving about a 3cm gap at the top (leaving around 10% of space).

3. Seal the jar with the lid and shake it vigorously for 2-3 minutes. Let the mixture settle for 24 hours, and resist the urge to touch the jar during this time.

4.After 24 hours, you'll notice the soil has separated into three distinct layers. The bottom layer is sand with the largest particles, the middle layer is silt, and the top layer is clay.

5. If you can clearly see three layers after 24 hours, refer to the graphic provided by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. For instance, if you have 18% clay, 45% silt, and 50% sand, you've got loam soil, which is fantastic for growing vegetables. Don't fret if your soil isn't loam; we can enhance it by adding more compost.

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3. Conclusion - Try Reencle? Try Compost

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 The structure of the soil plays a crucial role in supporting plant growth. A subpar soil structure can negatively impact a plant's access to water and air, the availability of nutrients in the soil, and the activity of microbial life (which aids in breaking down organic matter and improving or preventing deterioration of soil structure).

Many issues in home vegetable gardens arise not from pests, diseases, or nutrient deficiencies, but from unfavorable soil physical conditions. The simplest way to enhance soil quality is by adding high-quality compost. Compost significantly boosts the biodiversity in the soil, introducing beneficial microbes. Over time, compost enhances the structure of all soil types. It improves sandy soil by increasing its water- and nutrient-holding capacity, and it opens up clayey soil by creating air pockets that enhance drainage.

If your soil lacks nutrients, compost introduces microbiology that helps extract minerals from the sand, silt, or clay in your soil, enabling the healthy growth of crops. Vigorous and productive edible gardens demand nutrients, and compost provides plants with a living, slow-release source of nutrients. Why don’t we add compost to our valuable soil? Next blog will share the easiest way of making compost.

Reduce, Reuse, Regrow

2. How do we measure the quality of Soil

1. On a dry day, grab a small shovel and scoop up some soil. Sort through it or sift it with an old colander to get rid of any larger debris, rocks, and organic materials like leaves, sticks, and roots

2. Take a glass jar and fill about half of it with the soil you want to test. Add a drop of dishwashing liquid and water to the jar, leaving about a 3cm gap at the top (leaving around 10% of space). Take a glass jar and fill about half of it with the soil you want to test. Add a drop of dishwashing liquid and water to the jar, leaving about a 3cm gap at the top (leaving around 10% of space).

3. Seal the jar with the lid and shake it vigorously for 2-3 minutes. Let the mixture settle for 24 hours, and resist the urge to touch the jar during this time.

4.After 24 hours, you'll notice the soil has separated into three distinct layers. The bottom layer is sand with the largest particles, the middle layer is silt, and the top layer is clay.

5. If you can clearly see three layers after 24 hours, refer to the graphic provided by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. For instance, if you have 18% clay, 45% silt, and 50% sand, you've got loam soil, which is fantastic for growing vegetables. Don't fret if your soil isn't loam; we can enhance it by adding more compost.

3. Conclusion - Try Reencle? Try Compost

14-저.jpg__PID:fd7a95ed-5327-4996-9dfa-8b151ccd4bb1

The structure of the soil plays a crucial role in supporting plant growth. A subpar soil structure can negatively impact a plant's access to water and air, the availability of nutrients in the soil, and the activity of microbial life (which aids in breaking down organic matter and improving or preventing deterioration of soil structure).

Many issues in home vegetable gardens arise not from pests, diseases, or nutrient deficiencies, but from unfavorable soil physical conditions. The simplest way to enhance soil quality is by adding high-quality compost. Compost significantly boosts the biodiversity in the soil, introducing beneficial microbes. Over time, compost enhances the structure of all soil types. It improves sandy soil by increasing its water- and nutrient-holding capacity, and it opens up clayey soil by creating air pockets that enhance drainage.

If your soil lacks nutrients, compost introduces microbiology that helps extract minerals from the sand, silt, or clay in your soil, enabling the healthy growth of crops. Vigorous and productive edible gardens demand nutrients, and compost provides plants with a living, slow-release source of nutrients. Why don’t we add compost to our valuable soil? Next blog will share the easiest way of making compost.

Reduce, Reuse, Regrow

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